Introduction MELF Equation Macro Metrics Micro Metrics Beyond GDP How To Access Acknowledgements About Us
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Business Innovation Economics
Key Influences include, • Harvard economist Zvi Griliches (1930-1999) exhorted colleagues to seek more and better data through his seminal paper ‘Productivity Puzzles and R&D: Another Non-explanation’ and in his American Economic Association Presidential Address ‘Productivity, R&D and the Data Constraint’. He knew what had to be explained but did not have the means. A bound copy of Zvi's 1957 PhD thesis ‘Hybrid Corn: An Exploration in Economics of Technological Change’, presented to me by my University of Chicago post-graduate intern, honors his contribution. • Energy economist Nebojsa Nakicenovic, of the International Institute of Applied Systems Analysis, whose peer review of my 1993 paper ‘A Theory of Technological Change’, and our subsequent correspondence, primed me to take Griliches's data pleas more literally than others have. •The MELF equation is named for the Macroscope and recognizes a new way of observing economic data conceived within Industry Studies by Ralph E. Gomory, former Director of Research at IBM, when President of the Sloan Foundation in 2005. • Richard N. Foster, former Director of McKinsey & Co., shared research data from his foundational book ‘Innovation’, whose S-curves were absolutely crucial for validating the MELF.
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